Program Highlights

Leading businesses are creating and valuing entirely new forms of positive environmental AND social impact as well as quantifying previously ignored costs and risks. Define your success in the new economy with expanded methods for measuring risk and identifying new forms of value.

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Smart ‘Nudging’ Strategies for the Win: How Virgin Changed an Important Employee Behavior

Motivated to improve its fuel and carbon efficiency, as well as reduce operational costs, Virgin Atlantic experimented with a novel approach few, if any, in its industry have tried to date — combining behavioral science and smart data communication in order to change pilots’ behaviors around fuel consumption. The company engaged 335 captains over 40,000 flights, monitoring fuel use during three distinct phases: before planes took off, while they were in the air, and finally on the ground after landing. Pilots received all that data and were divided into four groups with four different sets of incentives aimed at motivating them to use less fuel. Join this session to find out what those incentives were, which ones worked best and how Virgin went about carrying out the whole project.

Claire Lambert
Manager – Fuel Efficiency Programme
Virgin Atlantic


From Enterprise Integration to Market Transformation: The Future of Corporate Sustainability

For the foreseeable future, business will be — must be — inseparable from the concept of sustainability, if the human project on Earth is to endure. The market must, and will, adjust to recognize the global nature of the issues we face. The next iteration of sustainable business practices, moving from enterprise integration to market transformation, will establish new norms of social and environmental behavior on a global level, translate those norms to the national and local levels, and develop solutions that are systemic in nature, rather than collections of siloed approaches. What steps can business take to thrive in that kind of transition? It starts by linking environmental and social stewardship to the existing market metrics and logic — by framing the issue as a market shift, or a market transformation. This shift is as replete in market opportunities as any other form of disruption, and it is already underway. If you are not already extending existing market metrics and logic accordingly, you are late.

Andy Hoffman
Author
Finding Purpose: Environmental Stewardship as a Personal Calling


Sustainability Assessment as a Path to Revenue Generation, New Brand Value and Superior Management

Earlier this sustainability all-star retailer Marks & Spencer shared that as of April 2016 more than 73% of all its products, based on the volume of items sold worldwide, have at least one explicitly desirable sustainable attribute – defined as meeting a Plan A social environmental best practice. That is a fantastic achievement and, amazingly, the number of such products has more than doubled in just the last few years. In addition, the company has assessed a range of methodologies for translating social and environmental impacts into financial models, adopted the best ones, and calculated that the annual net financial benefit of Plan A activities is currently £185 million ($244 million), up from £160 million ($211 million) a year ago and £145 ($191 million) two years ago. Join this session to learn how Marks & Spencer has reached such conclusions, what useful new metrics it has adopted along the way and how it is using them to distinguish itself as a sustainability leader globally.

Adam Elman
Head of Global Delivery: Sustainablity / Plan A
Marks & Spencer


Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals with Strategy, Goal-Setting and Innovation

Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with brand strategy, product and service innovation, and corporate sustainability goal-setting presents a huge opportunity to brands that understand the value of future-proofing themselves while creating shared value for multiple stakeholders. This presentation, combined with a follow-up discussion with other brands and leading experts, will capture the collective pool of experience of a handful of sophisticated brands, each of which has already embarked on an SDG-driven journey. SAP and others will share a diverse set of SDG-enabled brand actions and then launch into thoughtful discussion around specific tactics that might help the Sustainable Brands community make the best of contributing to the SDGs while deriving business and brand value in the process.

James Sullivan
Vice President, Sustainability Management & Strategy
SAP

The Natural Capital Protocol: A New Comprehensive Framework for Managing Natural Capital

The Natural Capital Coalition is a unique global multi-stakeholder collaboration that brings together leading initiatives and organizations to harmonize approaches to valuing and managing natural capital. The Coalition’s most significant output to date, the Natural Capital Protocol, was launched in July 2016 and is intended as a comprehensive source of trusted, credible and actionable information enabling understanding and management of natural capital. The Protocol is designed to be applicable to any business sector, operating in any geography, at any organizational level, and it allows executives to measure, value and integrate natural capital into existing business processes. In this session, Michelle Lapinski will introduce the Protocol and set up a discussion session exploring the results of ten in-depth corporate case studies involving The Coca-Cola Company, The Dow Chemical Company, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Hugo Boss, Kering, Natura, Nespresso, Nestlé, Olam International and Shell.

Michelle Lapinski
Steering Group
Natural Capital Coalition

The MultiCapital Scorecard: Following Up on Lessons Learned from a Leading Pilot Application

Many attempts have been made to operationalize the measurement and reporting of organizational performance in all of its dimensions, including social, economic and environmental. Most such efforts have fallen short, however, largely because of their failure to adequately address sustainability context, which requires that social, economic and ecological thresholds in the world be taken explicitly into account when attempting to assess the performance of organizations. Integrated reporting, in other words, must be science- and thresholds-based. This session brings an update on Ben & Jerry’s journey as the company attempts to test a pilot version of the MultiCapital Scorecard™ and understand what version of performance metrics employing context-based principles might work best.

Rob Michalak
Global Director of Social Mission
Ben & Jerry’s

Demonstrating the Impact of Sustainability Labels and Certification

In this session, ISEAL Alliance, the global membership association for sustainability labels and certification, will discuss the importance of why businesses need to measure the social and environmental impact of their sustainable sourcing programs and how they can demonstrate that impact. In an influential recent survey, ISEAL found that businesses are largely convinced of the impacts of sustainability labels and certification, but lack sufficient evidence to convince key executive decision makers. Businesses also want information on standards’ impacts to be more communicable, context-specific and robust. Join this session to learn how to use impact reports, producer and business stories, as well as multimedia assets from sustainability standards and certification programs, to demonstrate the positive impact of sustainable sourcing strategies.

Lara Koritzke
Director, Development and Communications
ISEAL Alliance

Measuring and Managing Brand Reputation: How CSR and Other Factors Influence Total Reputational Value

Reputation Dividend’s research clearly indicates that the measurable and manageable reputations of companies can causally, and with scientific rigor, be tied to their market values, and that their sustainability performance, in turn, contributes to their reputations. The methodology used by Reputation Dividend makes it possible to determine what the reputation contribution is for each of the following nine components to the market cap of a firm: quality of management, employee engagement, long-term investment potential, financial soundness, use of corporate assets, innovation, CSR, quality of products and global competitiveness. At the end of 2014, for example, CSR was found to be responsible for 10.7% of the total reputational value of S&P 500 companies. That is a conservative estimate of the value of CSR, given that at many companies CSR heavily influences many of the other right components of reputational value. Attend this session to get the latest freshly-launched data and understand how CSR and other components contribute to total reputational value and interact.

Simon Cole
Founding Partner
Reputation Dividend

The Value of Restoration: Turning $1 of Investment into $9 of Shared Value

Restore the Earth Foundation is an ambitious non-profit that has unlocked the business case for landscape scale restoration and is using it to restore 1 million acres in the Mississippi River Basin, North America’s Amazon. The key tool enabling them to pursue this mission is a valuation model showing that every $1 of private investment can be turned into $9 or more of value in a way that aligns with International Integrated Reporting standards. Learn why and how that is possible, and what implications it may have for all potential stakeholders.

P.J. Marshall
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Restore the Earth Foundation

The Ultimate Sustainability Business Case: An Updated and Upgraded Guide to Finding the ROI of Sustainability

After publishing multiple fantastic practical guides to unlocking and calculating the ROI of corporate sustainability – including The Sustainability Advantage (2002) and The New Sustainability Advantage (2012) – globally recognized sustainability guru Bob Willard is set to unveil a new book in this series under the working title The Ultimate Sustainability Advantage Workbook. This new e-book, to be presented and explained in detail for the first time at New Metrics ’16, will enable evaluation of everything a company can gain by performing at the “ultimate sustainability” level. It also will provide a framework by which to justify aspiring to the ultimate level of performance in all areas that science says is required of companies, as described in the Future-Fit Business Benchmark. And last but not least, it will provide the “ultimate flexibility” for building a business case for a single sustainability initiative, a cluster of initiatives, or all categories of initiatives that collectively would enable the whole company, a company division, or a company location to be truly sustainable. Intended for use by internal sustainability champions seeking executive support for more aggressive company action on sustainability issues, this is a must-have for everyone in the Sustainable Brands community!

Bob Willard
Sustainability Author and Speaker
Sustainability Advantage

Water Goals: Informing Strategies, Setting Goals and Finding Balance

With water named once again as a top risk for businesses and economies by the World Economic Forum this year, no corporate sustainability program would be complete without including commitments on fresh water. Some companies’ aims, from Coca-Cola’s Replenish to Southwestern Energy’s neutrality goal, have made big, public commitments on water, garnering significant attention from media, consumers and conservationists alike. What makes these “balance” goals so attractive? And how can companies ensure splashy goals also deliver genuine sustainability benefits? Join WWF for these answers and more, in a dynamic session aimed at equipping business leaders with the tools they need to inform water goals, strategies and programs. Among other things, this session will discuss how to bridge the gap between PR and impact, helping companies make their mark as leaders in water stewardship.

Lindsay Bass
Head of Corporate Water Stewardship
WWF

Lost in Translation: The Disconnect between Corporate and Investor Perceptions and Demands

While awareness and valuation of sustainable practices continues to grow overall, investors are demanding more data, better data, and deepening engagement with their investment prospects. This session will explore the landscape of investor attitudes and actions around purpose and sustainability, focusing on resolving important points of disconnect between corporate and investor perceptions. Speakers will share new research results and provide advice on resolving communication breakdowns, equipping CFOs and Investor Relations functions with ways to navigate complex emergent dynamics, and distinguishing activist investor actions from other types of investor attention.

Evan Harvey
Director of Corporate Responsibility
Nasdaq

Gregory Unruh
Sustainability Editor
MIT Sloan Management Review

Lost in Translation: The Disconnect between Corporate and Investor Perceptions and Demands

While awareness and valuation of sustainable practices continues to grow overall, investors are demanding more data, better data, and deepening engagement with their investment prospects. This session will explore the landscape of investor attitudes and actions around purpose and sustainability, focusing on resolving important points of disconnect between corporate and investor perceptions. Speakers will share new research results and provide advice on resolving communication breakdowns, equipping CFOs and Investor Relations functions with ways to navigate complex emergent dynamics, and distinguishing activist investor actions from other types of investor attention.

Evan Harvey
Director of Corporate Responsibility
Nasdaq

Gregory Unruh
Sustainability Editor
MIT Sloan Management Review


The Natural Capital Protocol: A New Comprehensive Framework for Managing Natural Capital

The Natural Capital Coalition is a unique global multi-stakeholder collaboration that brings together leading initiatives and organizations to harmonize approaches to valuing and managing natural capital. The Coalition’s most significant output to date, the Natural Capital Protocol, was launched in July 2016 and is intended as a comprehensive source of trusted, credible and actionable information enabling understanding and management of natural capital. The Protocol is designed to be applicable to any business sector, operating in any geography, at any organizational level, and it allows executives to measure, value and integrate natural capital into existing business processes. In this session, Michelle Lapinski will introduce the Protocol and set up a discussion session exploring the results of ten in-depth corporate case studies involving The Coca-Cola Company, The Dow Chemical Company, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Hugo Boss, Kering, Natura, Nespresso, Nestlé, Olam International and Shell.

Michelle Lapinski
Steering Group
Natural Capital Coalition


The Value of Restoration: Turning $1 of Investment into $9 of Shared Value

Restore the Earth Foundation is an ambitious non-profit that has unlocked the business case for landscape scale restoration and is using it to restore 1 million acres in the Mississippi River Basin, North America’s Amazon. The key tool enabling them to pursue this mission is a valuation model showing that every $1 of private investment can be turned into $9 or more of value in a way that aligns with International Integrated Reporting standards. Learn why and how that is possible, and what implications it may have for all potential stakeholders.

P.J. Marshall
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Restore the Earth Foundation


Sustainability Assessment as a Path to Revenue Generation, New Brand Value and Superior Management

Earlier this sustainability all-star retailer Marks & Spencer shared that as of April 2016 more than 73% of all its products, based on the volume of items sold worldwide, have at least one explicitly desirable sustainable attribute – defined as meeting a Plan A social environmental best practice. That is a fantastic achievement and, amazingly, the number of such products has more than doubled in just the last few years. In addition, the company has assessed a range of methodologies for translating social and environmental impacts into financial models, adopted the best ones, and calculated that the annual net financial benefit of Plan A activities is currently £185 million ($244 million), up from £160 million ($211 million) a year ago and £145 ($191 million) two years ago. Join this session to learn how Marks & Spencer has reached such conclusions, what useful new metrics it has adopted along the way and how it is using them to distinguish itself as a sustainability leader globally.

Adam Elman
Head of Global Delivery: Sustainablity / Plan A
Marks & Spencer

The MultiCapital Scorecard: Following Up on Lessons Learned from a Leading Pilot Application

Many attempts have been made to operationalize the measurement and reporting of organizational performance in all of its dimensions, including social, economic and environmental. Most such efforts have fallen short, however, largely because of their failure to adequately address sustainability context, which requires that social, economic and ecological thresholds in the world be taken explicitly into account when attempting to assess the performance of organizations. Integrated reporting, in other words, must be science- and thresholds-based. This session brings an update on Ben & Jerry’s journey as the company attempts to test a pilot version of the MultiCapital Scorecard™ and understand what version of performance metrics employing context-based principles might work best.

Rob Michalak
Global Director of Social Mission
Ben & Jerry’s


Sustainability Assessment as a Path to Revenue Generation, New Brand Value and Superior Management

Earlier this sustainability all-star retailer Marks & Spencer shared that as of April 2016 more than 73% of all its products, based on the volume of items sold worldwide, have at least one explicitly desirable sustainable attribute – defined as meeting a Plan A social environmental best practice. That is a fantastic achievement and, amazingly, the number of such products has more than doubled in just the last few years. In addition, the company has assessed a range of methodologies for translating social and environmental impacts into financial models, adopted the best ones, and calculated that the annual net financial benefit of Plan A activities is currently £185 million ($244 million), up from £160 million ($211 million) a year ago and £145 ($191 million) two years ago. Join this session to learn how Marks & Spencer has reached such conclusions, what useful new metrics it has adopted along the way and how it is using them to distinguish itself as a sustainability leader globally.

Adam Elman
Head of Global Delivery: Sustainablity / Plan A
Marks & Spencer


The Natural Capital Protocol: A New Comprehensive Framework for Managing Natural Capital

The Natural Capital Coalition is a unique global multi-stakeholder collaboration that brings together leading initiatives and organizations to harmonize approaches to valuing and managing natural capital. The Coalition’s most significant output to date, the Natural Capital Protocol, was launched in July 2016 and is intended as a comprehensive source of trusted, credible and actionable information enabling understanding and management of natural capital. The Protocol is designed to be applicable to any business sector, operating in any geography, at any organizational level, and it allows executives to measure, value and integrate natural capital into existing business processes. In this session, Michelle Lapinski will introduce the Protocol and set up a discussion session exploring the results of ten in-depth corporate case studies involving The Coca-Cola Company, The Dow Chemical Company, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Hugo Boss, Kering, Natura, Nespresso, Nestlé, Olam International and Shell.

Michelle Lapinski
Steering Group
Natural Capital Coalition


Demonstrating the Impact of Sustainability Labels and Certification

In this session, ISEAL Alliance, the global membership association for sustainability labels and certification, will discuss the importance of why businesses need to measure the social and environmental impact of their sustainable sourcing programs and how they can demonstrate that impact. In an influential recent survey, ISEAL found that businesses are largely convinced of the impacts of sustainability labels and certification, but lack sufficient evidence to convince key executive decision makers. Businesses also want information on standards’ impacts to be more communicable, context-specific and robust. Join this session to learn how to use impact reports, producer and business stories, as well as multimedia assets from sustainability standards and certification programs, to demonstrate the positive impact of sustainable sourcing strategies.

Lara Koritzke
Director, Development and Communications
ISEAL Alliance

Water Goals: Informing Strategies, Setting Goals and Finding Balance

With water named once again as a top risk for businesses and economies by the World Economic Forum this year, no corporate sustainability program would be complete without including commitments on fresh water. Some companies’ aims, from Coca-Cola’s Replenish to Southwestern Energy’s neutrality goal, have made big, public commitments on water, garnering significant attention from media, consumers and conservationists alike. What makes these “balance” goals so attractive? And how can companies ensure splashy goals also deliver genuine sustainability benefits? Join WWF for these answers and more, in a dynamic session aimed at equipping business leaders with the tools they need to inform water goals, strategies and programs. Among other things, this session will discuss how to bridge the gap between PR and impact, helping companies make their mark as leaders in water stewardship.

Lindsay Bass
Head of Corporate Water Stewardship
WWF

Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals with Strategy, Goal-Setting and Innovation

Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with brand strategy, product and service innovation, and corporate sustainability goal-setting presents a huge opportunity to brands that understand the value of future-proofing themselves while creating shared value for multiple stakeholders. This presentation, combined with a follow-up discussion with other brands and leading experts, will capture the collective pool of experience of a handful of sophisticated brands, each of which has already embarked on an SDG-driven journey. SAP and others will share a diverse set of SDG-enabled brand actions and then launch into thoughtful discussion around specific tactics that might help the Sustainable Brands community make the best of contributing to the SDGs while deriving business and brand value in the process.

James Sullivan
Vice President, Sustainability Management & Strategy
SAP

Demonstrating the Impact of Sustainability Labels and Certification

In this session, ISEAL Alliance, the global membership association for sustainability labels and certification, will discuss the importance of why businesses need to measure the social and environmental impact of their sustainable sourcing programs and how they can demonstrate that impact. In an influential recent survey, ISEAL found that businesses are largely convinced of the impacts of sustainability labels and certification, but lack sufficient evidence to convince key executive decision makers. Businesses also want information on standards’ impacts to be more communicable, context-specific and robust. Join this session to learn how to use impact reports, producer and business stories, as well as multimedia assets from sustainability standards and certification programs, to demonstrate the positive impact of sustainable sourcing strategies.

Lara Koritzke
Director, Development and Communications
ISEAL Alliance

Measuring and Managing Brand Reputation: How CSR and Other Factors Influence Total Reputational Value

Reputation Dividend’s research clearly indicates that the measurable and manageable reputations of companies can causally, and with scientific rigor, be tied to their market values, and that their sustainability performance, in turn, contributes to their reputations. The methodology used by Reputation Dividend makes it possible to determine what the reputation contribution is for each of the following nine components to the market cap of a firm: quality of management, employee engagement, long-term investment potential, financial soundness, use of corporate assets, innovation, CSR, quality of products and global competitiveness. At the end of 2014, for example, CSR was found to be responsible for 10.7% of the total reputational value of S&P 500 companies. That is a conservative estimate of the value of CSR, given that at many companies CSR heavily influences many of the other right components of reputational value. Attend this session to get the latest freshly-launched data and understand how CSR and other components contribute to total reputational value and interact.

Simon Cole
Founding Partner
Reputation Dividend

Water Goals: Informing Strategies, Setting Goals and Finding Balance

With water named once again as a top risk for businesses and economies by the World Economic Forum this year, no corporate sustainability program would be complete without including commitments on fresh water. Some companies’ aims, from Coca-Cola’s Replenish to Southwestern Energy’s neutrality goal, have made big, public commitments on water, garnering significant attention from media, consumers and conservationists alike. What makes these “balance” goals so attractive? And how can companies ensure splashy goals also deliver genuine sustainability benefits? Join WWF for these answers and more, in a dynamic session aimed at equipping business leaders with the tools they need to inform water goals, strategies and programs. Among other things, this session will discuss how to bridge the gap between PR and impact, helping companies make their mark as leaders in water stewardship.

Lindsay Bass
Head of Corporate Water Stewardship
WWF

Lost in Translation: The Disconnect between Corporate and Investor Perceptions and Demands

While awareness and valuation of sustainable practices continues to grow overall, investors are demanding more data, better data, and deepening engagement with their investment prospects. This session will explore the landscape of investor attitudes and actions around purpose and sustainability, focusing on resolving important points of disconnect between corporate and investor perceptions. Speakers will share new research results and provide advice on resolving communication breakdowns, equipping CFOs and Investor Relations functions with ways to navigate complex emergent dynamics, and distinguishing activist investor actions from other types of investor attention.

Evan Harvey
Director of Corporate Responsibility
Nasdaq

Gregory Unruh
Sustainability Editor
MIT Sloan Management Review

Sustainability Assessment as a Path to Revenue Generation, New Brand Value and Superior Management

Earlier this sustainability all-star retailer Marks & Spencer shared that as of April 2016 more than 73% of all its products, based on the volume of items sold worldwide, have at least one explicitly desirable sustainable attribute – defined as meeting a Plan A social environmental best practice. That is a fantastic achievement and, amazingly, the number of such products has more than doubled in just the last few years. In addition, the company has assessed a range of methodologies for translating social and environmental impacts into financial models, adopted the best ones, and calculated that the annual net financial benefit of Plan A activities is currently £185 million ($244 million), up from £160 million ($211 million) a year ago and £145 ($191 million) two years ago. Join this session to learn how Marks & Spencer has reached such conclusions, what useful new metrics it has adopted along the way and how it is using them to distinguish itself as a sustainability leader globally.

Adam Elman
Head of Global Delivery: Sustainablity / Plan A
Marks & Spencer


Smart ‘Nudging’ Strategies for the Win: How Virgin Changed an Important Employee Behavior

Motivated to improve its fuel and carbon efficiency, as well as reduce operational costs, Virgin Atlantic experimented with a novel approach few, if any, in its industry have tried to date — combining behavioral science and smart data communication in order to change pilots’ behaviors around fuel consumption. The company engaged 335 captains over 40,000 flights, monitoring fuel use during three distinct phases: before planes took off, while they were in the air, and finally on the ground after landing. Pilots received all that data and were divided into four groups with four different sets of incentives aimed at motivating them to use less fuel. Join this session to find out what those incentives were, which ones worked best and how Virgin went about carrying out the whole project.

Claire Lambert
Manager – Fuel Efficiency Programme
Virgin Atlantic


From Enterprise Integration to Market Transformation: The Future of Corporate Sustainability

For the foreseeable future, business will be — must be — inseparable from the concept of sustainability, if the human project on Earth is to endure. The market must, and will, adjust to recognize the global nature of the issues we face. The next iteration of sustainable business practices, moving from enterprise integration to market transformation, will establish new norms of social and environmental behavior on a global level, translate those norms to the national and local levels, and develop solutions that are systemic in nature, rather than collections of siloed approaches. What steps can business take to thrive in that kind of transition? It starts by linking environmental and social stewardship to the existing market metrics and logic — by framing the issue as a market shift, or a market transformation. This shift is as replete in market opportunities as any other form of disruption, and it is already underway. If you are not already extending existing market metrics and logic accordingly, you are late.

Andy Hoffman
Author
Finding Purpose: Environmental Stewardship as a Personal Calling


The Ultimate Sustainability Business Case: An Updated and Upgraded Guide to Finding the ROI of Sustainability

After publishing multiple fantastic practical guides to unlocking and calculating the ROI of corporate sustainability – including The Sustainability Advantage (2002) and The New Sustainability Advantage (2012) – globally recognized sustainability guru Bob Willard is set to unveil a new book in this series under the working title The Ultimate Sustainability Advantage Workbook. This new e-book, to be presented and explained in detail for the first time at New Metrics ’16, will enable evaluation of everything a company can gain by performing at the “ultimate sustainability” level. It also will provide a framework by which to justify aspiring to the ultimate level of performance in all areas that science says is required of companies, as described in the Future-Fit Business Benchmark. And last but not least, it will provide the “ultimate flexibility” for building a business case for a single sustainability initiative, a cluster of initiatives, or all categories of initiatives that collectively would enable the whole company, a company division, or a company location to be truly sustainable. Intended for use by internal sustainability champions seeking executive support for more aggressive company action on sustainability issues, this is a must-have for everyone in the Sustainable Brands community!

Bob Willard
Sustainability Author and Speaker
Sustainability Advantage

Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals with Strategy, Goal-Setting and Innovation

Aligning the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with brand strategy, product and service innovation, and corporate sustainability goal-setting presents a huge opportunity to brands that understand the value of future-proofing themselves while creating shared value for multiple stakeholders. This presentation, combined with a follow-up discussion with other brands and leading experts, will capture the collective pool of experience of a handful of sophisticated brands, each of which has already embarked on an SDG-driven journey. SAP and others will share a diverse set of SDG-enabled brand actions and then launch into thoughtful discussion around specific tactics that might help the Sustainable Brands community make the best of contributing to the SDGs while deriving business and brand value in the process.

James Sullivan
Vice President, Sustainability Management & Strategy
SAP

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